Andreas I Konge af Ungarn
Andreas I Konge af Ungarn

DatoStedKilde
Fřdt :1016Esztergom, KomaRome-Esztergom, Hungary-
Dřd :06 Jul 1060Zirc, Veszprém, Hungary-
Begravet :-Tihany, Veszprém, Hungary-
viet1037/3~ i Kiev-

Alder : 44
Alt.navn : Andrew I "the Catholic"", "Andrew I the White or the Catholic", "/Andrew I", "King of Hungary/"
Stilling : Konge af Ungarn: 1046-1060
Ref. : Barn: Ane: 28 x Tip og Mand: Barn: Ane: 27 og 30/31 x Tip

Noter : I. András - Endre of Hungary ÁRPÁD(házi) (Hungarian nobleman), King
Also Known As: "?????? I ???????", "Andrés", "Andreas", "Andrew", "Andras I /Hungary/", "Also called Andrew I "the Catholic"", "Andrew I the White or the Catholic", "/Andrew I", "King of Hungary/"
Birthdate: circa 1015 Birthplace: Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
Death: Died July 6, 1060 in Zirc, Veszprém, Hungary Place of Burial: Tihany, Veszprém, Hungary
Immediate Family:
Son of Basil 'the Blind' ;Vazul and N/a (? Concubine) from Tátony gens
Husband of Hungarian woman from Marót village and Anastasia of Kiev <
Father of
Iuri / Jurij / György / George ÁRPÁD(házi)
Adelaida, princess of Hungary
Salamon, King of Hungary
Dávid herceg, Prince of Hungary and
N.N. (Konstantin's grandchild)

Occupation: King of Hungary, Kung i Ungern, King Of Hungary (1046), KING OF HUNGARY, Konge, King of HUNGARY, Roi, de Hongrie, Kung av Ungern vv.1046-1060, Kung av Ungern
Managed by: Hannelore Caulk Scheu
About ÁRPÁD(házi) I. András - Endre King of Hungary
http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AndrasI
------------------------------------------------

Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian: I. (Fehér/Katolikus) András/Endre; c. 1015 - before 6 December 1060) was King of Hungary from 1046/1047 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. He strengthened the position of Christianity in his kingdom, while preserving the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary from the Holy Roman Empire. He tried to ensure the succession of his son which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him by force.
Early years
Andrew was the second son of Duke Vazul, who was a cousin of Stephen I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father.[1].
On 2 September 1031, King Stephen's only surviving son, Emeric was killed by a boar while hunting. The king wanted to secure the position of Christianity in his semi-pagan kingdom and therefore he planned to name his sister's son, Peter Orseolo as his successor. However, Duke Vazul, who was suspected of following pagan-customs, took part in a conspiracy to murder the king. The assassination attempt failed and Duke Vazul had his eyes gouged out, molten lead poured in his ears, and his three sons exiled.
[edit] Background
The Hungarian tribal society of the eleventh century still believed in exclusive inheritance through the male line and was not in favor of primogeniture, favoring instead agnatic seniority for determining the order of succession. This made other males of the Árpád dynasty's cadet lines dangerous to the incumbent king. Andrew's branch of the dynasty had long been rivals to the elder branch, to which Stephen I of Hungary and his father belonged. For the previous half century, the familial rivalry had centered mostly on the conflict between Christianity and paganism, respectively represented by the elder and the younger branches. In 1038, the extinction of the male line of the elder branch opened new opportunities for the younger, surviving male branch.
[edit] In exile
After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla married a member of the Piast dynasty. Andrew and Levente, possibly feeling overshadowed by their brother, continued on, settling in Kiev. There, Andrew married Anastasia of Kiev, a daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I the Wise.
The British prelates, led by Bishop Gerard of Csanád, decided to call back Andrew and his brothers to Hungary and wrote them a letter. By the time when Andrew and Levente arrived to Hungary, an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians had broken out. The two brothers made an alliance with the pagan rebels in Abaújvár, who accepted their leadership. King Peter tried to escape to the Holy Roman Empire, but he was arrested and blinded by the followers of the two princes.
[edit] Contest for the throne
Tihany abbey, burial place of Andrew.
The Hungarian chronicles related that following the downfall of King Peter, Andrew agreed with his elder brother, Levente, who was a committed pagan, that Andrew would rule over Hungary. Andrew, however, was crowned only in 1047, after his brother's death. Nevertheless, he continued the policies of Christianisation that had already been taking place. After his coronation, he confirmed King Stephen's decrees and invited foreign priests to Hungary, because the pagan rebels had murdered several members of the Christian clergy.
Relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war.[2] He invited his younger brother, Béla, who had become a successful military leader in Poland, to his court and entrusted him with the government of the third part of the Kingdom of Hungary.
In 1051, the Emperor Henry III undertook a campaign against Hungary, but the imperial troops were defeated at the Vértes Hills, while the imperial fleet was induced to turn back by a forged letter. At the end of the year, Abbot Hugh of Cluny was mediating between the two rulers, but the emperor refused to accept the peace. Next year the emperor led a fleet against Pozsony (Bratislava), but his ships were sunk by Andrew's men. In this time, Pope Leo IX tried to mediate a peace, but the emperor did not accept Andrew's offer. When the imperial troops were withdrawn, Andrew formed an alliance, in 1053, with Conrad II, Duke of Bavaria, supporting the opposition against the emperor.
In 1055, Andrew founded the Benedictine Abbey of Tihany on the shores of Lake Balaton and he also set up a monastery for Orthodox nuns there.
[edit] Succession crisis
In 1057, Andrew I tried to ensure his succession, by having his five-year-old son, Solomon of Hungary crowned as king. But the coronation of his son provoked his brother, Duke Béla who had been assigned as Andrew's successor, and the displeased duke left the king's court and left for his domains. In September 1058, Andrew had a personal meeting with the new King of Germany, Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor in Marchfeld, and they came to a peaceful agreement, marked by the betrothal of the child Solomon to the Henry's sister, Judith of Swabia.
After achieving peace with the Holy Roman Empire, Andrew tried to persuade Duke Béla to accept his son's succession, but the duke left for Poland to collect armies against his brother.
When Andrew heard of his brother's open rebellion, he sent his family to Austria, and prepared for the struggle, although he had been so ill that he was not even able to walk. Shortly afterwards, Duke Béla returned to Hungary with Polish troops and won a decisive victory over the king. Following his defeat, Andrew fled towards Austria, but he fell down of his horse at the Theben Pass. Andrew was arrested by Duke Béla's men and taken to Zirc where he died.
Andrew was buried in the Tihany Abbey.
[edit] Marriage and children
c. 1039: Anastasia of Kiev (c. 1023 - c. 1074/1096), daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife, Ingigerd of Sweden
* Adelaide (c. 1040 - 27 January 1062), wife of king Vratislaus II of Bohemia
* King Solomon of Hungary (1053 - 1087 or after)
* David (after 1053 - after 1094)
[edit] Legacy
Andrew's son Solomon never properly managed to establish himself as king; the sons of Andrew's younger brother gradually took over, particularly since neither Solomon, nor David (Andrew's youngest son) left surviving male descendants. Thus, Andrew's line continued in the Piast dynasty but not in Hungary.
Killed At Winsselburg
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Hungarian:
I. András magyar király [szerkesztés]
A Wikipédiából, a szabad enciklopédiából.
I. András (Endre) (1015. körül - Zirc, 1060 vége) Árpád-házi magyar király 1046-1060 között. Uralkodása alatt többször került szembe a Német-római Birodalommal, trónjától végül öccse, Béla fosztotta meg.
Tartalomjegyzék [elrejtés]
1 Élete
1.1 Származása, ifjúsága
1.2 Újra Magyarországon
1.3 Uralkodása
1.3.1 Viszály a németekkel
1.3.2 Belviszály
2 Halála
3 Családja
4 Források
Élete [szerkesztés]
Származása, ifjúsága [szerkesztés]
Édesapja Vászoly (Vazul) volt, akit az I. István ellen szervezett lázadása miatt megvakítottak és fülébe forró ólmot öntöttek, hogy uralkodásra alkalmatlanná tegyék. Vazul Géza testvérének, Mihálynak volt a fia. Apját kés?bbi krónikások tévesen nevezték meg Szár Lászlóként, aki Vazul testvére volt. Édesanyja egy Tátony nembeli n? volt. Két testvérér?l tesznek említést a források, bátyját Leventének, öccsét Bélának hívták.
Apjuk megvakításakor fiainak menekülnie kellett. El?ször Csehországba kerültek, majd nemsokkal kés?bb tovább mentek Lengyelországba, ahol Mieszko fejedelem fogadta ?ket. Ideérkezésük 1031 és 1034 (Mieszko halála) közötti id?szakra tehet?. A lengyel udvarban csak Béla maradt, a másik két testvér tovább állt Oroszország irányába. Itt Bölcs Jaroszláv vendégszeretetét élvezték. 1038 táján András elnyerte Jaroszláv lányának Anasztáziának kezét. Feltehet?en ennek a házasságnak volt az el?feltétele, hogy Andrásnak fel kellett vennie az ortodox kereszténységet. Ekkor Oroszország véd?szentjének Szent Andrásnak nevét kapta. Eredeti pogány nevét a források nem ?rizték meg.
...
Családja [szerkesztés]
András oroszországi tartózkodása idején feleségül vette Jaroszláv Anasztázia nev? lányát, a kijevi Szofija-székesegyházban. Az esküv?t ortodox szertartás szerint kötötték. Feleségét?l három gyermeke született:
Adelhaid, aki a cseh Vratiszláv fejedelem felesége lett, aki kés?bb Csehország els? királya lett, de felesége ezt már nem élte meg.
Salamon, a kés?bbi magyar király
Dávid
Forrás / Source:

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Andreas I Arpád, King of Hungary (1)
M, #221310, d. 1060
Last Edited=8 Mar 2007
Andreas I Arpád, King of Hungary was the son of unknown Arpád.1 He married Anastasia of Kiev, daughter of Jarislaus I, Grand Duke of Kiev and Ingegarde of Sweden. (1)
He died in 1060. (1)
Andreas I Arpád, King of Hungary gained the title of King Andreas I of Hungary in 1046. (1)
Child of Andreas I Arpád, King of Hungary and Anastasia of Kiev
Salamon Arpád, King of Hungary d. 1087 (1)
Forrás / Source:
http://www.thepeerage.com/p22131.htm#i221310
---------------------------------------
I. András
(1015 - Zirc, 1060 ?sze)
magyar király
Vászoly (Vazul) másodszülött fia, Salamon apja. 1046-tól 1060-ig Magyarország királya. 1037-ben Bölcs Jaroszláv kijevi fejedelem leányával, Anasztáziával kötött házasságot. (Szobruk a tihanyi apátság sétányán látható.) Apja megvakítása után testvéreivel, Leventével és Bélával a kijevi udvarba ment, ahol megkeresztelkedett.
Uralkodásának els? felét a királyi hatalom és a kereszténység helyreállítása, valamint a magyar-német viszony rendezése foglalta le. Fiát, Salamont 1057-ben megkoronáztatta. De az ellenségeskedések a német-római birodalommal csak III. Henrik császár 1056-ban bekövetkezett halála után kötött békével sz?ntek meg, amikor a császár leányát Salamon herceggel jegyezték el. 1060-ban háború tört ki a király és öccse, Béla között. Ennek során csatát vesztett, lovak tiporták el. Nem sokkal kés?bb Zircen, a vadászházában belehalt sérüléseibe. Az általa 1055-ben alapított tihanyi bencés apátságban temették el, ahol sírköve is látható.
Tihanyban a Visszhang-dombon, az Echó Vendégház falán emléktáblája van. Az apátság épülete el?tt álló, Alapító cím? szobor Varga Imre alkotása.

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Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian: I. (Fehér/Katolikus) András/Endre; c. 1015 - before 6 December 1060) was King of Hungary from 1046/1047 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. He strengthened the position of Christianity in his kingdom, while preserving the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary from the Holy Roman Empire. He tried to ensure the succession of his son which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him by force.
Andrew was the second son of Duke Vazul, who was a cousin of Stephen I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father.[1].
On 2 September 1031, King Stephen's only surviving son, Emeric was killed by a boar while hunting. The king wanted to secure the position of Christianity in his semi-pagan kingdom and therefore he planned to name his sister's son, Peter Orseolo as his successor. However, Duke Vazul, who was suspected of following pagan-customs, took part in a conspiracy to murder the king. The assassination attempt failed and Duke Vazul had his eyes gouged out, molten lead poured in his ears, and his three sons exiled.
Background
The Hungarian tribal society of the eleventh century still believed in exclusive inheritance through the male line and was not in favor of primogeniture, favoring instead agnatic seniority for determining the order of succession. This made other males of the Árpád dynasty's cadet lines dangerous to the incumbent king. Andrew's branch of the dynasty had long been rivals to the elder branch, to which Stephen I of Hungary and his father belonged. For the previous half century, the familial rivalry had centered mostly on the conflict between Christianity and paganism, respectively represented by the elder and the younger branches. In 1038, the extinction of the male line of the elder branch opened new opportunities for the younger, surviving male branch.
In exile
After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla married a member of the Piast dynasty. Andrew and Levente, possibly feeling overshadowed by their brother, continued on, settling in Kiev. There, Andrew married Anastasia of Kiev, a daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I the Wise.
The British prelates, led by Bishop Gerard of Csanád, decided to call back Andrew and his brothers to Hungary and wrote them a letter. By the time when Andrew and Levente arrived to Hungary, an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians had broken out. The two brothers made an alliance with the pagan rebels in Abaújvár, who accepted their leadership. King Peter tried to escape to the Holy Roman Empire, but he was arrested and blinded by the followers of the two princes.
Contest for the throne
Tihany abbey, burial place of Andrew.
The Hungarian chronicles related that following the downfall of King Peter, Andrew agreed with his elder brother, Levente, who was a committed pagan, that Andrew would rule over Hungary. Andrew, however, was crowned only in 1047, after his brother's death. Nevertheless, he continued the policies of Christianisation that had already been taking place. After his coronation, he confirmed King Stephen's decrees and invited foreign priests to Hungary, because the pagan rebels had murdered several members of the Christian clergy.
Relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war.[2] He invited his younger brother, Béla, who had become a successful military leader in Poland, to his court and entrusted him with the government of the third part of the Kingdom of Hungary.
In 1051, the Emperor Henry III undertook a campaign against Hungary, but the imperial troops were defeated at the Vértes Hills, while the imperial fleet was induced to turn back by a forged letter. At the end of the year, Abbot Hugh of Cluny was mediating between the two rulers, but the emperor refused to accept the peace. Next year the emperor led a fleet against Pozsony (Bratislava), but his ships were sunk by Andrew's men. In this time, Pope Leo IX tried to mediate a peace, but the emperor did not accept Andrew's offer. When the imperial troops were withdrawn, Andrew formed an alliance, in 1053, with Conrad II, Duke of Bavaria, supporting the opposition against the emperor.
In 1055, Andrew founded the Benedictine Abbey of Tihany on the shores of Lake Balaton and he also set up a monastery for Orthodox nuns there.
Succession crisis
In 1057, Andrew I tried to ensure his succession, by having his five-year-old son, Solomon of Hungary crowned as king. But the coronation of his son provoked his brother, Duke Béla who had been assigned as Andrew's successor, and the displeased duke left the king's court and left for his domains. In September 1058, Andrew had a personal meeting with the new King of Germany, Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor in Marchfeld, and they came to a peaceful agreement, marked by the betrothal of the child Solomon to the Henry's sister, Judith of Swabia.
After achieving peace with the Holy Roman Empire, Andrew tried to persuade Duke Béla to accept his son's succession, but the duke left for Poland to collect armies against his brother.
When Andrew heard of his brother's open rebellion, he sent his family to Austria, and prepared for the struggle, although he had been so ill that he was not even able to walk. Shortly afterwards, Duke Béla returned to Hungary with Polish troops and won a decisive victory over the king. Following his defeat, Andrew fled towards Austria, but he fell down of his horse at the Theben Pass. Andrew was arrested by Duke Béla's men and taken to Zirc where he died.
Andrew was buried in the Tihany Abbey.
Marriage and children
c. 1039: Anastasia of Kiev (c. 1023 - c. 1074/1096), daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife, Ingigerd of Sweden
Adelaide (c. 1040 - 27 January 1062), wife of king Vratislaus II of Bohemia
King Solomon of Hungary (1053 - 1087 or after)
David (after 1053 - after 1094)
Legacy
Andrew's son Solomon never properly managed to establish himself as king; the sons of Andrew's younger brother gradually took over, particularly since neither Solomon, nor David (Andrew's youngest son) left surviving male descendants. Thus, Andrew's line continued in the Piast dynasty but not in Hungary.
References
^ Some modern sources claim that Duke Vazul married Katun Anastazya of Bulgaria who bore Andrew and his brothers, Levente and Béla I of Hungary.
^
Sources
Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996)
Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), f?szerkeszt?: Kristó, Gyula, szerkeszt?k: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994)
Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. - A kezdetekt?l 1526-ig, f?szerkeszt?: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981)

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Dřd efter 6 juli 1060
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Andrew I of Hungary
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian: I. (Fehér/Katolikus) András/Endre, Slovak: Ondrej I) (c. 1015 - before 6 December 1060, Zirc), King of Hungary (1046/1047-1060). He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. However, he could strengthen the position of Christianity in his kingdom and he also managed to save the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary against the Holy Roman Empire. He tried to ensure the succession of his son which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him with force.
Early years
Andrew was the second son of Duke Vazul, a cousin of Stephen I of Hungary, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan costums[1].
On September 2, 1031, King Stephen's only surviving son, Emeric was killed by a boar while hunting. The king wanted to secure the position of Christianity in his semi-converted kingdom; therefore he was planning to name his sister's son, Peter Urseolo as his successor. However, Duke Vazul, who was suspected to be following pagan-costums, took part in a conspiracy aimed at the murder of the king. But the assassination attempt failed and Duke Vazul had his eyes gouged out and molten lead poured in his ears and his three sons were exiled.
Background
The Hungarian chronicles related that following the downfall of King Peter, Andrew agreed with his elder brother, Levente, who was a decided pagan, that Andrew would rule over Hungary. Andrew, however, was crowned only in 1047, after his brother's death. Nevertheless, he continued the policies of Christianisation that had already been taking place. After his coronation, he confirmed King Stephen's decrees and invited foreign priests to Hungary, because the pagan rebels had murdered several members of the Christian clergy.
Relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew sent embassy to the imperial court and offered to accept the Emperor's suppremacy. But the Emperor Henry III refused the peace; therefore Andrew had to make preparations for the approaching war. He invited his younger brother, Béla, who had become a successful military leader in Poland, to his court and entrusted him with the government of the third part of the Kingdom of Hungary.
In 1051, the Emperor Henry III undertook a campaign against Hungary, but the imperial troops were defeated at the Vértes Hills, while the imperial fleet was induced to turn back by a forged letter. At the end of the year, Abbot Hugh of Cluny was mediating between the two rulers, but the emperor refused to accept the peace. Next year the emperor lead a fleet against Pozsony (Bratislava), but his ships were sunk by Andrew's men. In this time, Pope Leo IX tried to mediate a peace, but the emperor did not accept Andrew's offer. When the imperial troops were withdrawn, Andrew formed an alliance, in 1053, with Conrad II, Duke of Bavaria, supporting the opposition against the emperor.
In 1055, Andrew founded the Benedictine Abbey of Tihany on the shores of Lake Balaton and he also set up a monastery for Orthodox nuns there.
[edit]Succession crisis
In 1057, Andrew I tried to ensure his succession, by having his five-year-old son, Solomon of Hungary crowned as king. But the coronation of his son provoked his brother, Duke Béla who had been assigned as Andrew's successor, and the displeased duke left the king's court and left for his domains. In September 1058, Andrew had a personal meeting with the new King of Germany, Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor in Marchfeld, and they came to a peaceful agreement, marked by the betrothal of the child Solomon to the Henry's sister, Judith of Swabia.
After achieving peace with the Holy Roman Empire, Andrew tried to persuade Duke Béla to accept his son's succession, but the duke left for Poland to collect armies against his brother.
When Andrew heard of his brother's open rebellion, he sent his family to Austria, and prepared for the struggle, although he had been so ill that he was not even able to walk. Shortly afterwards, Duke Béla returned to Hungary with Polish troops and won a decisive victory over the king. Following his defeat, Andrew fled towards Austria, but he fell down of his horse at the Theben Pass. Andrew was arrested by Duke Béla's men and taken to Zirc where he died.
Andrew was buried in the Tihany Abbey.
Marriage and children
c. 1039: Anastasia of Kiev (c. 1023 - c. 1074/1096), daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife, Ingigerd of Sweden
Adelaide (c. 1040 - 27 January 1062), wife of king Vratislaus II of Bohemia
King Solomon of Hungary (1053 - 1087 or after)
David of Hungary (after 1053 - after 1094)
Legacy
Andrew's son Solomon never properly managed to establish himself as king; the sons of Andrew's younger brother gradually took over, particularly since neither Solomon, nor David (Andrew's youngest son) left surviving male descendants. Thus, Andrew's line continued in the Piast dynasty but not in Hungary.
Sources
Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996)
Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), f?szerkeszt?: Kristó, Gyula, szerkeszt?k: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994)
Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. - A kezdetekt?l 1526-ig, f?szerkeszt?: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981)
Hungarian tribal society was not in favor of primogeniture, favoring instead agnatic seniority for determining the order of succession. This made other males of the Árpád dynasty's cadet lines dangerous to the incumbent king. Andrew's branch of the dynasty had long been rivals to the elder branch, to which Stephen I of Hungary and his father belonged. For the previous half century, the familial rivalry had centered mostly on the conflict between paganism and Christianity, represented (and utilized), respectively, by the younger and elder branch. The elder branch went extinct in the male line in 1038, which opened new opportunities for the younger, surviving male line. Hungarian clan society of the eleventh century still believed in exclusive inheritance through the male line.
[edit]In exile
After their father's tragical death, the three brothers was obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla married a member of the Piast dynasty. Andrew and Levente, possibly feeling overshadowed by their brother, continued on, settling in Kiev. There, Andrew married Anastasia of Kiev, a daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I the Wise.
In the meantime, in Hungary, King Peter was expelled by King Stephen's brother-in-law, Sámuel Aba in 1041, but the former managed to win back his throne in two years with the military aid provided him by Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor. In exchange for the support, King Peter accepted the Emperor's supremacy over his kingdom. King Peter, however, was not able to strengthen his rule in Hungary. He even lost the support of the clergy by expelling King Stephen's widow, Giselle of Bavaria from Hungary.
The Hungarian prelates, lead by Bishop Gerard of Csanád, decided to call back Andrew and his brothers to Hungary and wrote them a letter. By the time when Andrew and Levente arrived to Hungary, an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians had broken out. The two brothers made an alliance with the pagan rebels in Abaújvár, who accepted their leadership. King Peter tried to escape to the Holy Roman Empire, but he was arrested and blinded by the followers of the two princes.
[edit]Contest for the throne
--------------------
Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian: I. (Fehér/Katolikus) András/Endre) (c. 1015 - before 6 December 1060, Zirc), King of Hungary (1046/1047-1060). He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. However, he could strengthen the position of Christianity in his kingdom and he also managed to save the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary against the Holy Roman Empire. He tried to ensure the succession of his son which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him with force.
--------------------
Died : Eft 06 Jul 1060
--------------------
Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian : I. (Fehér/Katolikus) András/Endre; c. 1015 - before 6 December 1060) was King of Hungary from 1046/1047 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty . After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians . He strengthened the position of Christianity in his kingdom, while preserving the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary from the Holy Roman Empire . He tried to ensure the succession of his son which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him by force.
Early years
Andrew was the second son of Duke Vazul , who was a cousin of Stephen I , the first King of Hungary . His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father.
On 2 September 1031, King Stephen's only surviving son, Emeric was killed by a boar while hunting. The king wanted to secure the position of Christianity in his semi-pagan kingdom and therefore he planned to name his sister's son, Peter Orseolo as his successor. However, Duke Vazul, who was suspected of following pagan-customs, took part in a conspiracy to murder the king. The assassination attempt failed and Duke Vazul had his eyes gouged out, molten lead poured in his ears, and his three sons exiled.
Background
The Hungarian tribal society of the eleventh century still believed in exclusive inheritance through the male line and was not in favor of primogeniture , favoring instead agnatic seniority for determining the order of succession. This made other males of the Árpád dynasty's cadet lines dangerous to the incumbent king. Andrew's branch of the dynasty had long been rivals to the elder branch, to which Stephen I of Hungary and his father belonged. For the previous half century, the familial rivalry had centered mostly on the conflict between Christianity and paganism, respectively represented by the elder and the younger branches. In 1038, the extinction of the male line of the elder branch opened new opportunities for the younger, surviving male branch.
In exile
After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia , they continued to Poland where Béla married a member of the Piast dynasty . Andrew and Levente , possibly feeling overshadowed by their brother, continued on, settling in Kiev . There, Andrew married Anastasia of Kiev , a daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I the Wise .
The British prelates, led by Bishop Gerard of Csanád , decided to call back Andrew and his brothers to Hungary and wrote them a letter. By the time when Andrew and Levente arrived to Hungary, an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians had broken out. The two brothers made an alliance with the pagan rebels in Abaújvár , who accepted their leadership. King Peter tried to escape to the Holy Roman Empire, but he was arrested and blinded by the followers of the two princes.
Contest for the throne
The Hungarian chronicles related that following the downfall of King Peter , Andrew agreed with his elder brother, Levente, who was a committed pagan, that Andrew would rule over Hungary. Andrew, however, was crowned only in 1047, after his brother's death. Nevertheless, he continued the policies of Christianisation that had already been taking place. After his coronation , he confirmed King Stephen's decrees and invited foreign priests to Hungary, because the pagan rebels had murdered several members of the Christian clergy .
Relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war. He invited his younger brother, Béla, who had become a successful military leader in Poland , to his court and entrusted him with the government of the third part of the Kingdom of Hungary .
In 1051, the Emperor Henry III undertook a campaign against Hungary, but the imperial troops were defeated at the Vértes Hills, while the imperial fleet was induced to turn back by a forged letter. At the end of the year, Abbot Hugh of Cluny was mediating between the two rulers, but the emperor refused to accept the peace. Next year the emperor led a fleet against Pozsony (Bratislava ), but his ships were sunk by Andrew's men. In this time, Pope Leo IX tried to mediate a peace, but the emperor did not accept Andrew's offer. When the imperial troops were withdrawn, Andrew formed an alliance, in 1053, with Conrad II, Duke of Bavaria , supporting the opposition against the emperor.
In 1055, Andrew founded the Benedictine Abbey of Tihany on the shores of Lake Balaton and he also set up a monastery for Orthodox nuns there.
Succession crisis
In 1057, Andrew I tried to ensure his succession, by having his five-year-old son, Solomon of Hungary crowned as king. But the coronation of his son provoked his brother, Duke Béla who had been assigned as Andrew's successor, and the displeased duke left the king's court and left for his domains. In September 1058, Andrew had a personal meeting with the new King of Germany , Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor in Marchfeld , and they came to a peaceful agreement, marked by the betrothal of the child Solomon to the Henry's sister, Judith of Swabia .
After achieving peace with the Holy Roman Empire , Andrew tried to persuade Duke Béla to accept his son's succession, but the duke left for Poland to collect armies against his brother.
When Andrew heard of his brother's open rebellion, he sent his family to Austria , and prepared for the struggle, although he had been so ill that he was not even able to walk. Shortly afterwards, Duke Béla returned to Hungary with Polish troops and won a decisive victory over the king. Following his defeat, Andrew fled towards Austria, but he fell down of his horse at the Theben Pass . Andrew was arrested by Duke Béla's men and taken to Zirc where he died.
Andrew was buried in the Tihany Abbey.
Marriage and children
c. 1039: Anastasia of Kiev (c. 1023 - c. 1074/1096), daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife, Ingigerd of Sweden
Adelaide (c. 1040 - 27 January 1062), wife of king Vratislaus II of Bohemia
King Solomon of Hungary (1053 - 1087 or after)
David (after 1053 - after 1094)
Legacy
Andrew's son Solomon never properly managed to establish himself as king; the sons of Andrew's younger brother gradually took over, particularly since neither Solomon, nor David (Andrew's youngest son) left surviving male descendants. Thus, Andrew's line continued in the Piast dynasty but not in Hungary.
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Wiklopedia:
Andreas I (död 1060) var kung av Ungern mellan 1046 och 1060. Han var möjligen brorson till Stefan I av Ungern. Han var gift med Anastasia av Kiev.
När Stefan I:s son Imre dog 1031 vid en jakt, fanns bara den hedniske Vazul och Ladislaus Szárs tre söner, Andreas, Béla och Levente som erkända tronföljare. Peter Orseolos anhängare bländade Vazul, och Ladislaus söner jagades bort frĺn landet. De tre prinsarna flydde först till Tjeckien och därefter till Polen.
När Ungern blev tysk-romersk vasallstat efter 1044, beslöt den ungerska högadeln att skicka efter Andreas i Ryssland. När Andreas ankom till landet pĺ hösten 1046 hyllade de ungerska rebellerna honom som kung vid Abaújvár, en stad i nordöstra Ungern.
Mĺnga ungrare förväntade sig att Andreas skulle avskaffa kristendomen i landet och ĺterställa den gamla ordningen. Men sĺ blev inte fallet och ett nytt uppror bröt ut. Biskop Gellért blev ett offer för dessa uppror. Rebellerna kastade ner honom frĺn en klippa i Buda, som nuförtiden kallas Gellértberg.
1047 hade Andreas ĺterställt den kristna ordningen och blev enväldig kung av Ungern. Han mĺste i första hand skydda Ungern frĺn Henrik III, som utan framgĺng angrep Ungern 1050, 1051 och 1052. Striderna slutade med freden i Tribur 1053.
Senare kom det till meningsskiljaktigheter mellan Andreas och Béla, varefter Béla anföll Ungern med hjälp av den polske fursten. I slaget sĺrades Andreas och tillfĺngatogs. Han dog 1060.
Barn [redigera]
1. Adelaide av Ungern
2. Salomon I av Ungern (kung av Ungern)
Företrädare:
Peter I Kung av Ungern
1046-1060 Efterträdare:
Béla I
Källa: Europeiska regenter - Maecenas, 1999 - ISBN 963-645-053-6
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Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian: I. (Fehér/Katolikus) András/Endre) (c. 1015 - before 6 December 1060, Zirc), King of Hungary (1046/1047-1060). He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. However, he could strengthen the position of Christianity in his kingdom and he also managed to save the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary against the Holy Roman Empire. He tried to ensure the succession of his son which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him with force. -------------------- Source:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Andrew I of Hungary King of Hungary
King of Hungary Reign 1046-1060 Coronation c. 1046 Predecessor Peter I Successor Béla I
Spouse Anastasia of Kiev Issue Adelaide, Duchess of Bohemia Solomon Prince David Full name Andrew the White Andrew the Catholic Father Vazul Mother unknown Born c. 1015
Died before 6 December 1060 (aged 44-45) Zirc, Kingdom of Hungary Burial Tihany Abbey
Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian: I. (Fehér/Katolikus) András/Endre; c. 1015 - before 6 December 1060) was King of Hungary from 1046/1047 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. He strengthened the position of Christianity in his kingdom, while preserving the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary from the Holy Roman Empire. He tried to ensure the succession of his son which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him by force.
Contents 1 Early years 2 Background 3 In exile 4 Contest for the throne 5 Succession crisis 6 Marriage and children 7 Legacy 8 References 9 Sources
Early years Andrew was the second son of Duke Vazul, who was a cousin of Stephen I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father.[1].
On 2 September 1031, King Stephen's only surviving son, Emeric was killed by a boar while hunting. The king wanted to secure the position of Christianity in his semi-pagan kingdom and therefore he planned to name his sister's son, Peter Orseolo as his successor. However, Duke Vazul, who was suspected of following pagan-customs, took part in a conspiracy to murder the king. The assassination attempt failed and Duke Vazul had his eyes gouged out, molten lead poured in his ears, and his three sons exiled.
Background The Hungarian tribal society of the eleventh century still believed in exclusive inheritance through the male line and was not in favor of primogeniture, favoring instead agnatic seniority for determining the order of succession. This made other males of the Árpád dynasty's cadet lines dangerous to the incumbent king. Andrew's branch of the dynasty had long been rivals to the elder branch, to which Stephen I of Hungary and his father belonged. For the previous half century, the familial rivalry had centered mostly on the conflict between Christianity and paganism, respectively represented by the elder and the younger branches. In 1038, the extinction of the male line of the elder branch opened new opportunities for the younger, surviving male branch.
In exile After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla married a member of the Piast dynasty. Andrew and Levente, possibly feeling overshadowed by their brother, continued on, settling in Kiev. There, Andrew married Anastasia of Kiev, a daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I the Wise.
The British prelates, led by Bishop Gerard of Csanád, decided to call back Andrew and his brothers to Hungary and wrote them a letter. By the time when Andrew and Levente arrived to Hungary, an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians had broken out. The two brothers made an alliance with the pagan rebels in Abaújvár, who accepted their leadership. King Peter tried to escape to the Holy Roman Empire, but he was arrested and blinded by the followers of the two princes.
Contest for the throne
Tihany abbey, burial place of Andrew.The Hungarian chronicles related that following the downfall of King Peter, Andrew agreed with his elder brother, Levente, who was a committed pagan, that Andrew would rule over Hungary. Andrew, however, was crowned only in 1047, after his brother's death. Nevertheless, he continued the policies of Christianisation that had already been taking place. After his coronation, he confirmed King Stephen's decrees and invited foreign priests to Hungary, because the pagan rebels had murdered several members of the Christian clergy.
Relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war.[2] He invited his younger brother, Béla, who had become a successful military leader in Poland, to his court and entrusted him with the government of the third part of the Kingdom of Hungary.
In 1051, the Emperor Henry III undertook a campaign against Hungary, but the imperial troops were defeated at the Vértes Hills, while the imperial fleet was induced to turn back by a forged letter. At the end of the year, Abbot Hugh of Cluny was mediating between the two rulers, but the emperor refused to accept the peace. Next year the emperor led a fleet against Pozsony (Bratislava), but his ships were sunk by Andrew's men. In this time, Pope Leo IX tried to mediate a peace, but the emperor did not accept Andrew's offer. When the imperial troops were withdrawn, Andrew formed an alliance, in 1053, with Conrad II, Duke of Bavaria, supporting the opposition against the emperor.
In 1055, Andrew founded the Benedictine Abbey of Tihany on the shores of Lake Balaton and he also set up a monastery for Orthodox nuns there.
Succession crisis In 1057, Andrew I tried to ensure his succession, by having his five-year-old son, Solomon of Hungary crowned as king. But the coronation of his son provoked his brother, Duke Béla who had been assigned as Andrew's successor, and the displeased duke left the king's court and left for his domains. In September 1058, Andrew had a personal meeting with the new King of Germany, Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor in Marchfeld, and they came to a peaceful agreement, marked by the betrothal of the child Solomon to the Henry's sister, Judith of Swabia.
After achieving peace with the Holy Roman Empire, Andrew tried to persuade Duke Béla to accept his son's succession, but the duke left for Poland to collect armies against his brother.
When Andrew heard of his brother's open rebellion, he sent his family to Austria, and prepared for the struggle, although he had been so ill that he was not even able to walk. Shortly afterwards, Duke Béla returned to Hungary with Polish troops and won a decisive victory over the king. Following his defeat, Andrew fled towards Austria, but he fell down of his horse at the Theben Pass. Andrew was arrested by Duke Béla's men and taken to Zirc where he died.
Andrew was buried in the Tihany Abbey.
Marriage and children
c. 1039: Anastasia of Kiev (c. 1023 - c. 1074/1096), daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife, Ingigerd of Sweden
Adelaide (c. 1040 - 27 January 1062), wife of king Vratislaus II of Bohemia King Solomon of Hungary (1053 - 1087 or after) David (after 1053 - after 1094) Legacy Andrew's son Solomon never properly managed to establish himself as king; the sons of Andrew's younger brother gradually took over, particularly since neither Solomon, nor David (Andrew's youngest son) left surviving male descendants. Thus, Andrew's line continued in the Piast dynasty but not in Hungary.
References 1.^ Some modern sources claim that Duke Vazul married Katun Anastazya of Bulgaria who bore Andrew and his brothers, Levente and Béla I of Hungary. 2.^ Sources Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996) Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), f?szerkeszt?: Kristó, Gyula, szerkeszt?k: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994) Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. - A kezdetekt?l 1526-ig, f?szerkeszt?: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981) Andrew I of Hungary House of Árpád Born: c. 1015 Died: before 6 December 1060 Regnal titles Preceded by Peter Urseolo King of Hungary 1046-1060 Succeeded by Béla I
Categories: Roman Catholic monarchs | 1060 deaths | House of Árpád | Hungarian monarchs Hidden categories: Articles containing Hungarian language text
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http://finnholbek.dk/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I28012&tree=2
Andras I King of Hungary f. ca. 1015 Ungarn - d. 1061 in Battle
Konge af Ungarn 1046-1061


Far Vazul (the Blind) of Hungary , f. Skřnnet 990, Hungary (Ungarn) , d. eft. 1038, Hungary (Ungarn) (Alder ~ 49 ĺr)
Mor Katun of Bulgaria

Anastasia of Kiev , f. eft. feb. 1019, d. eft. 1074 (Alder ~ 55 ĺr) Gift ca. 1046 Břrn
1. Salomon King of Hungary , f. ca. 1051, Hungary (Ungarn) , d. 1087, Hungary (Ungarn) (Alder ~ 36 ĺr)
2. Adelheid of Hungary , d. 27 jan. 1062

Kilde: Leo, Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: Page 104.




FarMor
Vazul "den blinde" Storfyrste af Ungarn - Ane: 28/29 x TipAnastasia Storfyrstinde af Ungarn - Ane: 28/29 x Tip
ĆgteskabBřrn
1037/38 - Anastasia Agmunda Yaroslavsdatter Dronning af Ungarn Omk 1051 - Salomon I Konge af Ungarn
- - Adelheid Dronning af Bohemia

Andreas I Konge af Ungarn
* 1016
† 06 Jul 1060
Vazul "den blinde" Storfyrste af Ungarn - Ane: 28/29 x Tip
* 976
† 1037








Anastasia Storfyrstinde af Ungarn - Ane: 28/29 x Tip
* 978-987
† 06 Okt 1014
Michael Prins af Ungarn - Ane: 29/30 x Tip
* 0955
† 978


Adelheid Prinsesse Af Polen - Ane: 29/30 x Tip
* 0950
† 997



Samuel Tsar af Bulgarien - Ane: 29 x Tip
* Omk 0945
† 06 Okt 1014


Agatha Tsarinde af Bulgarien - Ane: 29 x Tip
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-
Taksony Fyrste af Ungarn - Ane: 30/31 x Tip
* Omk 0920 - † 0971
NN Af Kumanien - Ane: 30/31 x Tip
* Omk 0932 - † 972

Ziemomys I Hertug Af Polen - Ane: 30-32 x Tip
* omk 890 - † 0964
Gorka Prinsesse af Polen - Ane: 30-32 x Tip
* Omk 0920 - -


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